Category: Featured

A Farmer’s Point of View … Bill and Robin Popp of Laughing Chicken Farm

What challenges do Florida farmers face? What rewards do they reap? What’s it like to work the land? Florida Food & Farm writer Nicole Danna talked to the owners of six farms around the state to ask them what they want the public to know about farming. Here’s Bill Popp, one of them, speaking about his farm in Trenton. (Read what the other five farmers wish you knew about the profession in our latest issue of Florida Food & Farm, now online.) Laughing Chicken Farm, Trenton Farmers: Bill and Robin Popp About the farm: A family-owned and -operated farm in Trenton offering pasture-raised chicken, turkey, and pork. Farming shouldn’t be cruel. I love what Joel Salatin said at our visit to his farm (Polyface Farm): “If your farm has a smell, then you’re doing something wrong.” The Industrial Revolution was great for the car industry, but not so great for farms. The best farm is a partnership. We treat the animals well, and they can offer us their best. Farming challenges your brain. Planning, problem-solving, and creative thinking – all are needed on a successful farm. Every day, a farmer is overcoming challenges with the animals, the weather, the predators, and even pests. Finding answers that are innovative, affordable, and sustainable is where the real challenge lies. You can produce a lot on a little land. It’s amazing to me...

Read More

Unripe papayas get a green light for taste

Although I have a flourishing garden, I rarely buy plants. Instead, I beg and gather seeds or wait to see what “volunteers” grow in my yard. A few months ago, I was surprised to see what looked like a papaya tree. I figured either birds had dropped seeds, or they were in the homemade compost I had recently spread. Either way, the tree was a welcome addition to my backyard “fruit salad” that also includes mangoes, figs, and pineapples. My first step was to check the internet to see what I needed to know about growing papayas. And the first warning I found was to not transplant them. They have deep roots that can be destroyed by digging. Despite the warning, I realized mine was in a shady spot with no room to grow. It had to be moved. My guess is, I got to it when the roots were still small because the move didn’t seem to bother it. After two weeks of hand-watering, it settled in and started to grow … and grow and grow. Today, it is over 15 feet tall. My next question was whether I had a male or female plant. Yes, you need one of each for papayas to fruit. Turns out, I had a female, but there must have been a male hovering nearby because I soon had long green fruits dangling...

Read More

Miami Chefs Dish for No Kid Hungry at Taste of the Nation

Wynwood Kitchen + Bar / Photo by LibbyVision.com One of the most important culinary events to raise awareness about childhood hunger is South Florida’s Taste of the Nation for No Kid Hungry. Eighty top chefs, sommeliers, and mixologists donated their time, talent, and passion to the cause that was led by the founding event chairman, Allen Susser; and the restaurant co-chairman, Timon Balloo. More than 1,100 charity-minded food-lovers were lured to Wynwood’s Soho Studios in Miami on June 17 for the 28th annual fundraiser, hosted by Y100’s Froggy and CBS4’s Emmy-nominated morning-news anchor, Marybel Rodriguez. The event raised $70,000, which...

Read More

Pin It on Pinterest

Subscribe To Our Newsletter
Subscribe To Our NewsletterJoin our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from Florida Food & Farm.

You have Successfully Subscribed!